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Johnson Estate Winery

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Frederick Johnson
 
July 15, 2020 | Frederick Johnson

We Shall Persevere - A Look at 100 Years Ago

PERSPECTIVE:  100 years ago - in 1920 - at the Johnson Farm (aka Sunnyslope)
Circa 1954, Owner Fred Johnson Jr. with grandfather, Frederick William Johnson.     

  • My grandfather, Frederick William Johnson, is building an apple cold storage shed.  He frames it out with big timbers repurposed from a dairy barn that in turn was built about 1820 by William Peacock.  The cold storage shed is now our winery and the those original 1820 timbers still hold the roof up.
  • His wife of 3 years, Nan Scouller, has presented him with a baby daughter, Antoinette, who in 1920 is about to turn two.  My father will be born in September of 1921.  The brick house next door that he has been fixing up since 1911 is now fully ready for his young family.
  • The fourth wave of the “Spanish Flu” epidemic has just ended.  It killed 675,000 Americans and perhaps 50 million people world-wide. There is no vaccine.
  • The country is in a severe post-war, post-pandemic recession.  There are race riots in Chicago and anarchist bombings on Wall Street. 
  • President Wilson is pretending to govern the country from his sickbed. FDR, running as Vice President, will get trounced in November 1920 election: 404 electoral college votes to 127.
  • Prohibition becomes the law of the land, and grandfather reputedly makes his first batch of wine that fall.
  • The Dust Bowl (Like Erie is over five feet below its current high levels), the Depression, World War II and the atom bomb will all follow, but Grandfather’s little farm enterprise prospers in good times and survives in bad.

So here we are, one hundred years later, struggling to navigate the latest pandemic, looking forward to a great harvest, but uncertain about political, economic, and environmental futures.  But we have been here before.  We will persevere, as will you.  As farmers, we know that there will always be challenges ahead, both man-made and God-given.  But we are always optimists; determined optimists, dedicated to always leaving this place and our customers and community a little better and a little happier than they were before.

Time Posted: Jul 15, 2020 at 2:16 PM
Frederick Johnson
 
June 23, 2020 | Frederick Johnson

Outdoor Tastings in Farmhouse Gardens

     
OUTDOOR TASTINGS IN FARMHOUSE GARDENS (weather permitting)
  • Saturdays and Sundays, 11am to 5pm (July - September)
  • Sixteen wines offered on Outdoor Tasting Menu
  • First come, first serve; guests may need to wait in garden
  • No groups greater than six people, please
  • Limited seating available - purchase picnic fare and/or enjoy a glass of wine in the gardens
  • And come and see our Daisy Lane - great for photos!                                                
    REMINDERS:  WINERY IS OPEN DAILY, 10am - 6pm
  • Tasting Room - Has reduced capacity; tastings are first come, first served
  • (no reservations needed at this point, but we will let you know)
  • Groups limited to four to six
  • Wine by the bottle and picnic fare for outside consumption
  • Curbside Pick-up/Delivery available daily
Time Posted: Jun 23, 2020 at 6:51 PM
Frederick Johnson
 
March 21, 2020 | Frederick Johnson

FREE Shipping Fights Corona Virus + No Contact Curbside Pick-Ups

PLEASE NOTE, 3/12/2020: 
Johnson Estate is providing "No Contact Curbside Pick-Up", please call 10am-6pm to pre-order/pay with credit card and arrange delivery of wines to your car - we are happy to do this.  We will ask to see your driver's license through your car window. 

The winery is open from 10am-6pm daily and while we have suspended tastings and tours, you may shop for your wines for Take-Out bottle purchases.
        

 
The text from our recent email to our online customers:
Spring and summer are coming and discerning wine consumers like you often plan to visit wineries like ours......but then comes this Corona Virus.  So, in the spirit of the moment, and to try to help "flatten the curve", we would like to offer you the following options for 750/375mL bottles (except where noted).

GOOD NEIGHBORS PROGRAM:
Free Shipping to Ohio, NY and PA for minimum purchases of 6 bottles or more.  Also applies to six bottles of Proprietor's Red and House Red (1.5mL).
Promotion Code: GOODNEIGHBOR

FREE SHIPPING, EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI
To customers in states east of the Mississippi with minimum purchase of 12 bottles. 
Promotion Code:  EOMFREE

50% OFF SHIPPING, WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI
To customers in states west of the Mississippi with minimum purchase of 12 bottles.
Promotion Code:  50SHIPWEST

ONLINE OR CALL:
Please visit our website anytime or give us a call (1-800-Drink-NY or 1-800-374-6569) between 10AM and 5:30PM Eastern Time, 7 days a week.  Our tasting room team will be happy to speak with you. You are welcome to share this offer with your friends and family.

We look forward to seeing you at the winery - hopefully it can be sooner rather than later.
Sincerely,
Frederick & Jennifer Johnson

AND NOW, THE FINE PRINT:

  • Bottles must be 750ml or 375 ml.
  • You may order more than the six or twelve-bottle minimum quantity - but please do order in increments of 3 bottles to reduce wasting packing materials.
  • We are licensed to sell in nearly thirty states - please check the state list here.
  • Deliveries of wine require a signature of someone over 21 years of age.
  • We can ship to your home or work address; your choice.
  • Transit times vary from two days to seven days.  For shipment to the West Coast and Florida, we generally ship wines on Monday to attempt to avoid weekend delays.  

PICK-UP OPTIONS AT THE WINERY:
In the spirit of social distancing, we are happy to accept online or phone "pre-orders" for those who live nearby.  Just let us know that you'd prefer for us to bring the wines to your car.   

Time Posted: Mar 21, 2020 at 12:20 PM
Frederick Johnson
 
August 26, 2019 | Frederick Johnson

Veraison

What is Veraison?
Taken from the French, veraison is the change of color of grapes.  It is a signal that the plant and its berries are putting their energies into ripening the berries instead of berry 

The unripe grapes, all a bright green color, begin to turn either pale yellow or dark blue/purple in the case of “red” wine grapes.  This is a photograph of Johnson Estate's Pinot Noir grapes which have started but not completed veraison.  At this stage, the vines have begun to transport energy stores to the grapes and they increase in size as sugar levels increase.

Birds Looking for Early Ripening Grapes
In western New York and Pennsylvania, where 30,000 acres of vineyards are found along Lake Erie, the end of September is known for the aroma of ripening grapes and the commencement of the region's harvest of Concords.  When this begins to happen, it is a signal that the grapes are becoming sweeter.  The majority of the region's vineyards are Concord grapes which tend to ripen later than some wine varieties.  As a result, the early-ripening wine varieties, like Johnson Estate's Maréchal Foch and Pinot Noir need to be protected from birds whose choices are fewer at the beginning of the season.

At Johnson Estate, these two early-ripening grape varieties are protected from hungry birds through the use of ballons, kevlar streamers, and periodic cannon shots.  In addition, there is a recording of a hawk attacking a starling and all of these efforts help to diminish the birds' interest in these first-ripening grapes.

More Information may be found here:
https://winefolly.com/review/veraison-when-grapes-turn-red/https://articles.extension.org/pages/31098/parts-of-the-grape-vine:-shoots

Fred Johnson, Owner

Time Posted: Aug 26, 2019 at 7:26 PM
Frederick Johnson
 
May 13, 2018 | Frederick Johnson

What's Bud Break?

Bang!  Starting Gun. 
"Bud Break" announces the start of a new growing season in the vineyards - a new vintage begins.

Will there be enough heat-light units to finish the race at harvest with gold medal quality grapes for the year's wine?  Or will we come up short, with grapes insufficiently ripe to make the best wines? 

In 2017, "bud break" - officially when half of the buds on the grape vine are showing at least the edge of half of a leaf - was about two weeks early.  This year, we're about five days late than the May 4th average.  Last year was ideal for producing excellent vintages; not too cool, not too wet; long mild fall; just right.  Five days later than the average bud break in 2018 is no great handicap, but the vineyards will need a little extras heat during the summer (but not over 90° please)
and extra sunny days to arrive at harvest in "medal form" this year.

Time Posted: May 13, 2018 at 7:11 PM
Frederick Johnson
 
December 15, 2017 | Frederick Johnson

ICE WINES: Mother Nature is the one who decides....

Dear Mother Nature,
Thanks for getting me up so early Thursday morning.  The stars were sparkling over the vineyards as I tromped through knee-deep snow hoping for an early harvest. 

Each winter, we watch the long-range weather forecasts to see when you will bless us with several "cold-enough" days (that means 12-15 degrees!) to crystallize the juice in the grapes we net for ice wine.  Earlier this week, it began to look promising, and we'd sent out the "Ice Wine Harvest Alert" to all our hardy volunteers. 

So, on Thursday, well before dawn, I stopped in the midst of the snowy Chambourcin vineyard to check on the state of the grapes set aside for ice wine.   When I popped a grape berry into my mouth, it was slushy.....but not yet crunchy.  A no go......not cold enough.  Then I had to text the volunteers:  "stay in bed!".

So, back to watching your weather.  In the meantime, and for all of the regular folk too, here's a link to an article on ice wines in the most recent issue of Edible Western New York.  Publisher, Stephanie Schuckers Burdo, was with us last December and took that photo of me hauling a crate full of Chambourcin; then she put the camera down and helped with the harvest! 

Sincerely,
Fred Johnson, A hopeful vignernon

Time Posted: Dec 15, 2017 at 11:02 AM
Frederick Johnson
 
October 30, 2017 | Frederick Johnson

A Thanksgiving Message from the Vineyards

Last week, another harvest was completed; today the first flakes of snow swirl, but melt as they touch the golden leaves.  It is time for giving thanks.  Thanks to our creator and shepherd who has given us the most glorious fall in many, many years. Not only that, but a growing season that has delivered the cleanest, ripest, most luscious bunches of grapes; bunch upon bunch, ton upon ton.  It should be a memorable vintage.
We owe abundant thanks too, for the loyalty of our customers, the steady, unstintingly cheerful work of our teammates in the vineyards, cellar, and wine-shop.  We are grateful, as well, for the community that surrounds and supports us, and we wish all good cheer.

As is our custom after harvest, we are again pleased to offer free shipping to customers nearby and far away.  We know that many of the people who visit us during the season have roots in our community, but either now live at some distance or have family or friends that do.  It is with this broad, western New York 'diaspora' in mind that we reach out in gratitude with this humble offer of wine transport - free as Santa’s sleigh, if not so magical!

As the first bands of snow march off Lake Erie, I am warmed by the memories of summer just past: the vineyard walks with cheerful, interested and interesting visitors, the golden sunsets out over Lake Erie, the planting of our newest Pinot vineyard block, the breathless unloading of our newest wine tanks and barrels, and the raising of a new barn among the vineyards.  I eagerly look forward to tasting the wines of 2017.  I forecast that they will be excellent.

Jennifer and I wish you all a wonderful Thanksgiving among family and friends.  We thank you for your interest and support and may your holiday season be joyful.  May you return to visit us, preferably in person if you can, or on-line in the meantime!

Time Posted: Oct 30, 2017 at 8:00 PM

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